A quick Review on Cirrhosis

REVIEW CIRRHOSIS

 

 

So what is cirrhosis and why is it very important to review for the the NCLEX ?

Cirrhosis is basically scarring of the liver.  It occurs when there is severe hepatic inflammation or necrosis.

Common causes of cirrhosis:

  • ALCOHOL
  • HEPATITS C
  • HEPATITIS B

Complications of Cirrhosis:

(It is very important to understand these complications for the NCLEX.)

PORTAL HYPERTENSION

An increase in the pressure in the portal vein.  It is usually due to an obstruction of blood flow within the portal vein.

ASCITES

– an accumulation of fluid within the peritoneal cavity.

– there will be retention of water and sodium in the body.

ESOPHAGEAL VARICES

– occurs when thin walled esophageal veins become distended from an increase in pressure.

JAUNDICE

– is caused by hepatic cirrhosis.  Develops because the liver cells cannot effectively excrete bilirubin.

PORTAL-SYSTEMIC ENCEPHALOPATHY

– a manifestation by neurological symptoms

PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT

in patients with Cirrhosis:

  • FATIGUE
  • ABDOMINAL PAIN
  • WEIGHT LOSS
  • ASTERIXIS

LABORATARY ASSESSMENT:

There will be an increase in serum levels of (AST)/ Aspartate aminotransferase, (ALT) / Alanine aminotransferase and (LDH) / Lactate Dehydrogenase.

♣ INTERVENTIONS:

– depends on the SYMPTOM and the COMPLICATION.

FOR ASCITES

  • INTERVENTION FOR ASCITIES INCLUDES *PARACENTESIS – IF DIET AND DRUG MANAGEMENT FAILS.

♠ PARACENTESIS

– The procedure is performed in the bedside.

 


 

Cirrhosis is a late stage of scarring (fibrosis) of the liver caused by many forms of liver diseases and conditions, such as hepatitis and chronic alcoholism. The liver carries out several necessary functions, including detoxifying harmful substances in your body, cleaning your blood and making vital nutrients.

Cirrhosis occurs in response to damage to your liver. Each time your liver is injured, it tries to repair itself. In the process, scar tissue forms. As cirrhosis progresses, more and more scar tissue forms, making it difficult for the liver to function.

Decompensated cirrhosis is the term used to describe the development of specific complications resulting from the changes brought on by cirrhosis. Decompensated cirrhosis is life-threatening.

The liver damage done by cirrhosis generally can’t be undone. But if liver cirrhosis is diagnosed early and the cause is treated, further damage can be limited and, rarely, reversed.

Symptoms

Cirrhosis often has no signs or symptoms until liver damage is extensive. When signs and symptoms do occur, they may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Bleeding easily
  • Bruising easily
  • Itchy skin
  • Yellow discoloration in the skin and eyes (jaundice)
  • Fluid accumulation in your abdomen (ascites)
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Swelling in your legs
  • Weight loss
  • Confusion, drowsiness and slurred speech (hepatic encephalopathy)
  • Spiderlike blood vessels on your skin
  • Redness in the palms of the hands
  • Testicular atrophy in men
  • Breast enlargement in men

cgf

Welcome to this NCLEX Quick E Course: There is only ONE GOAL with this course, and that is to pass the NCLEX.  You have made it this far, you have graduated Nursing School.  You basically have learned, in some way or another the content and essential knowledge necessary to pass the NCLEX exam.  With the help of this course, it will now depend on how you are able to apply this knowledge and strategies towards the NCLEX.

Before starting this Quick E Course, I will require 3 essential qualities that you have from within:

The Three C’s includes:

Confidence: Confident that you are going to pass the NCLEX Exam.
Commitment: Committed in doing everything, to pass this Exam.
Concentration: Focus and Concentration throughout this review.

This COURSE will INCLUDE… ♣

The Quick E Course
Test Taking Strategies
Maslow's  Hierarchy
The Nursing Process
Lab Values (Important)
Intravenous Fluids
Electrolyte Values
NCLEX Review on Medication (IMPORTANT)
The Cardiac System
The Neuro System
The Respiratory System
The G.I. System
The G.U. System
The Endocrine System
The Integumentry System
The Hematologic System
The Musculoskeletal System
Eye and Ear Disorders
Infection Control
Management and Delegation
Types of Dysrhytmias
Pharmacology
Drug Classifications & Adverse Reactions.

Classification and Side Effects
The Antidote for certain Drugs.
Vitamins and Mineral
Cardiac Pharmacology
Cardiovascular Drugs (Simplified)
Cardiac Glycosides
Antidysrhytmics
Anticoagulants
Diuretics
Thrombolytics
Cardiac Stimulants
Central Nervous System Pharm.

CNS Stimulants
Anticonvulsants
Barbituates
Benzodiazepines
Succinimides
Antiparkinsonians
Antimyasthenic (Cholinergics)
Opioid Analgesics
Opioid Antagonists
Antiseizure Medication
Respiratory Pharmacology

Bronchodilators
Mucolytic Agents and Expectorants
Antihistamine
Antitussives
G.I. System Pharmacology

GI Drugs
Antacids
Anticholinergics
Antiemetics
Antidiarrheals
Cathartics/Laxatives
G.U. System Pharmacology

Spasmolytics
Urinary Anti-infectives
Pharmacology Review

A basic review of pharmacology
Overview of diff. type of Antibiotics
Adrenegic Antagonist Drugs
Parasympathetic Nervous System
Hematological Disorders

Antiplatelets
Anticoagluants
Autonomic Nervous System

Adrenergic Drugs
Cholinergic Agents
Anticholinergics
Antiparkinsonian Agents
Beta Adrenergic Blockers

Anti-infectives
Aminoglycosides
Maternity and Pediatrics
Maternal Assessment
Signs of Pregnancy
Complications of Pregnancy
1st, 2nd & 3rd Trimester Pregnancy
Ectopic Pregnancy
Placenta Previa
Preeclamsia

Caring for the Maternal Client

Signs of Pregnancy
Newborn and Pediatrics
Care of the Newborn
Growth & Development
Cardiovascular Disorders

Respiratory Disorders
Neurological Disorders
Gastrointestinal Disorders
Pediatrics: An NCLEX Review

Psychiatric Disorders
Psychotic Disorders
Substance Abuse
Drug Use

ctestpsos

All the Instructions to ACCESS the COURSE will be sent through your email.

All Proceeds Help Support my Help the Homeless Project below.  ⇓⇓⇓⇓ 

tive

 

 

 

 

 

♥♥♥

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

.

 

 

 

Advertisements